INVESTOR NEWS: New Proposals Could Put Restrictions on Short-Term Rentals in Nashville

Thinking about purchasing a home to use as a short-term rental property? New proposals could limit the use of short-term rentals, which is something investors will need to keep in mind moving forward.

INVESTOR NEWS: New Proposals Could Put Restrictions on Short-Term Rentals in Nashville Close
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INVESTOR NEWS: New Proposals Could Put Restrictions on Short-Term Rentals in Nashville

Posted by Gary Ashton: Blog on Saturday, March 25th, 2017 at 2:50pm.

Nashville Short Term Rentals If you’re thinking about buying a Nashville home or perhaps already purchased a home and are considering going the the Airbnb route to help offset living expenses or to simply use the property as an investment, several new bills are being discussed that could put restrictions on short-term rentals moving forward. 

According to reports, three separate proposals are actively being considered that would have a significant impact on how members belonging to websites like Airbnb and HomeAway can use their home or property in terms of a short-term rental. 

In short, the first of the three proposals could effectively eliminate non-owner occupied short-term rentals by 2021, while the other two proposals would either put a one- or three-year stop on new permits that allow for short-term rentals throughout the city. 

Home owners against the short-term rental boom are saying its increasing noise, traffic, and completely changing the face of neighborhoods all over Nashville. Other home owners or investors who are either for the use of short-term rentals or perhaps even list their own home on Airbnb or HomeAway say such claims are unjustified and are asking for anyone with these and other complaints to simply prove it before any drastic decision is made by the city. 

Earlier this month, The Tennessean reported that Davidson County received at least 975 complaints against 568 individual addresses with short-term rental permits from April 1, 2015 to February 14, 2017. Most of these properties were non-owner occupied spaces that are owned by investors, and it was also noted that the actual figure could be even higher given the permitting process only just started back in April of 2015. 

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