Nashville Homes and The Great Flood of 2010

  As most of you already know Nashville and it's residents have been severley impacted by flooding on a scale that is still being evaluated. The full impli...

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Nashville Homes and The Great Flood of 2010

Posted by Gary Ashton: RE/MAX ADMIN on Tuesday, May 4th, 2010 at 4:12pm.

 

As most of you already know Nashville and it's residents have been severley impacted by flooding on a scale that is still being evaluated.

The full implications of the devastation to home owners and builders alike is going to slowly come to light as the stories about the affects of the flood start to come through.

The biggest impact is obviously being felt buy the home owners who lived in areas that were deemed safe from flooding and as a result didn't need to carry flood insurance. The problem for these people is how do the deal with total loss. Who do they turn to for help and support? What they really need is financial aid to help them through the tough times until they can at least renovate and repair their homes or find new accommodation.

The question of who is financially responsible for the devastation is a tricky one because the floods were an act of God and as such don't seem to come under any other form of insurance.  Not having flood insurance isn't something any of us think about...especially when we are told that we don't need it. People rarely buy flood insurance on the off chance!

I think that most people feel that the homeowners who lost their homes need to compensated in some way and be giving a way out of a desperate situation. Wether its from local donations, the Government or  aid from other sources these people deserve help.

There is also another sector of people that have had their lives impacted in an unforeseeable way. people may become homeless even though their homes weren't effect directly by the flood! Image if you have had your house on the market, then a buyer comes along and you negotiate a deal and "sell" them your home. Now you can go out and put an offer on another home. If you then come to terms you are locked into buying that home. if the home is then flooded what happens to the home you are selling? As far as I can see there is no reason to stop the sale. The buyers have probably sold their house so they need a home to move into.....that means unless the seller had a clause in the contract that says..."i will not close on the sale of my house if the house I am buying is flooded" means that the seller has to close. Obviously they can't buy the flooded home. That contract can be voided quite easily as its not in the same state or better when they contracted on the house. That means the seller has to move out and then find another property...quickly!

So...scenarios like that will start to come to the surface and public attention...so keep checking back. One of the team agents, Melissa Tanner, has been in touch with the state, the Governor and the Whitehouse trying to find answers about how to deal with the tax extension and homes that were under contract and now that they can't close the effect of the tax credit deadlines etc. 

 

 

Gary Ashton

The Ashton Real Estate Group of RE/MAX Advantage

The #1 Real Estate Team in Tennessee and #4 RE/MAX team in the world!

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